Basic Chicken Broth Recipe – Holistically Delicious

Chicken Broth

 

Actually, the basic recipe for chicken broth was planned to be my last, cuddly winter post, right before I would have prepared a lot of wonderfully fresh, green and as always delicious spring ideas for you next week. At the moment, however, I am sitting on our back porch at 77 °F, bare feet, enjoying the wonderful Tennessee sunshine. This really does not feel very wintry and I have to admit, I can barely hide my joy over these really early, really warm temperatures. So, let us handle this post as a transition between winter and spring. After all, a hot broth is delicious on cold days, though it is just as good with warmth as the Asian cuisine proves again and again with its Ramen, Khow Suey and other delicacies.

My basic recipe for chicken broth is quite simple, I usually use it as the base for other recipes such as chicken ragout, Ramen or the like. Thus, it will not taste too dominant, yet bring a delicate, delicious flavor. The most important thing is the chicken that gives the broth its name. Be absolutely strict here: Quality is a MUST HAVE, best organic, massaged by the farmers every day, free-range, bought locally on the farmers market and so forth! Your chicken broth will taste so much better if you spend a few extras dollars here.

 

Chicken Broth

 

Do not be afraid to take a whole chicken. It is really not necessary to do anything fancy with it except washing it and putting it in the pot. This is easy peasy and you barely have to touch the raw meat! For some time now I have decided to buy only whole chickens and butcher them myself. On the one hand it is cheaper, even the best quality (because the butcher has less work with it) and on the other hand it encourages creativity. My grandma, a retired butcher, did that when I was little and when I stayed at my grandparents I was allowed to help her in the kitchen. It is nice to have the chance to continue such a wonderful tradition and actually, I learned a lot, for example how to cut a chicken into its individual parts, which pieces you will have when you butcher a whole chicken and what you can do with them. When it comes to eating meat quality is one thing that is important to me, another thing I like to take into consideration is a holistic approach. Why should I just eat the breast, if there is so much more like the delicious giblets, the tender meat on the bones and the chicken’s tail (which my grandmother always put aside for me).

The broth is a great entry-level recipe for the holistic idea: you cook the chicken as a whole including the giblets, so you are really using EVERY part of your chicken. Finally, you will reward yourself with the extracted chicken flavor that you can use for soups, sauces and more, and as an add-on you gain the most tender meat that will delight your palate!

See you at the farmers market, lovelies!

 

Chicken Broth

 

INGREDIENTS

for 0.7 gal broth

total time: 1h 40 min

1 chicken with giblets

4 carrots

1 small celery root or 4 celery sticks

1 leek or 1 bunch of spring onions

1 onion

4 sprigs of parsley

0.5 gal of cold water

1 tbsp salt

1 tbsp sugar

1 piece of ginger (thumb size)

20 peppercorns

5 cloves

2 bay leaves

 

PREPARATION

Wash the chicken and giblets under cold water. Put both into a large, tall pot and add water. If you do not like giblets, you can leave them out. I am a big fan and I would not want to miss the fantastic taste they are adding to the broth.

 

Chicken Broth

 

Thoroughly clean the carrots and cut them into slices. Quarter the onions. You do not have to peel both vegetables, as the aromatic flavors hidden in those parts will even enrich the broth. However, you should cut off the skin of the celery root before chopping, preferably even generously. If you cannot find a whole root, use celery sticks. That works as well. Wash them under running water and chop roughly. Halve the leek lengthwise and rinse with cold water to remove the sand between the leaves. Remove the roots and cut the leek halves in thirds. Just as with the celery, there is a good substitute for leek: spring onions. Clean these by removing the outer leaf and roots. Subsequently, divide the spring onions into three. Peel the ginger, chop it roughly and add the vegetables, parsley, spices, salt and sugar to the chicken. *

Bring the broth slowly to a boil and simmer on medium flame for about 75 minutes.

Chicken Broth

Remove the chicken and giblets, peel off the meat from the bones and use it for other dishes. You can eat the giblets as well and do not have to dispose them. I usually enjoy them right away, fresh from the pot and still warm.

Pass the broth through a sieve and squeeze the vegetables with a spoon until all the liquid has dripped off. Pour it still hot into clean glasses and close each glass immediately. The glasses can be stored in the refrigerator for several days. It is also a good idea to fill the broth in plastic bags that close airtight. You can freeze the bags flat in the fridge as soon as the broth is cold. This way you save space and the broth is quickly defrost whenever you need it.

* I am going to have more information about soup vegetables (carrots, celery, leeks, parsley) for you guys soon. Stay tuned for this topic and more in a completely new section. It will be up on the blog in just a little bit!

 

Basic Chicken Broth Recipe

02/26/2018
: for 0.7 gal

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 chicken with giblets
  • 4 carrots
  • 1 small celery root or 4 celery sticks
  • 1 leek or 1 bunch of spring onions
  • 1 onion
  • 4 sprigs of parsley
  • 0.5 gal of cold water
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 piece of ginger (thumb size)
  • 20 peppercorns
  • 5 cloves
  • 2 bay leaves
Directions
  • Step 1 Wash the chicken and giblets under cold water. Put both into a large, tall pot and add water. If you do not like giblets, you can leave them out. I am a big fan and I would not want to miss the fantastic taste they are adding to the broth.
  • Step 2 Thoroughly clean the carrots and cut them into slices. Quarter the onions. You do not have to peel both vegetables, as the aromatic flavors hidden in those parts will even enrich the broth. However, you should cut off the skin of the celery root before chopping, preferably even generously. If you cannot find a whole root, use celery sticks. That works as well. Wash them under running water and chop roughly. Halve the leek lengthwise and rinse with cold water to remove the sand between the leaves. Remove the roots and cut the leek halves in thirds. Just as with the celery, there is a good substitute for leek: spring onions. Clean these by removing the outer leaf and roots. Subsequently, divide the spring onions into three. Peel the ginger, chop it roughly and add the vegetables, parsley, spices, salt and sugar to the chicken.
  • Step 3 Bring the broth slowly to a boil and simmer on medium flame for about 75 minutes. Remove the chicken and giblets, peel off the meat from the bones and use it for other dishes. You can eat the giblets as well and do not have to dispose them. I usually enjoy them right away, fresh from the pot and still warm.
  • Step 4 Pass the broth through a sieve and squeeze the vegetables with a spoon until all the liquid has dripped off. Pour it still hot into clean glasses and close each glass immediately. The glasses can be stored in the refrigerator for several days. It is also a good idea to fill the broth in plastic bags that close airtight. You can freeze the bags flat in the fridge as soon as the broth is cold. This way you save space and the broth is quickly defrost whenever you need it.

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