Grandma’s Lemon Loaf Cake

lemon cake

 

I did something completely new yesterday: I was invited to give a guest lecture on architecture at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, which was an incredibly exciting challenge. Yet, it was wonderful to talk about buildings, to discuss them, and to carry the students away. Architecture was fun again!

For me, it often happens that I need a few years to enjoy certain things anew. Do you know this kind of feeling? Besides architecture, it was the same with writing, hiking and baking. As a young child, I just loved baking cakes and cookies with my grandmother. Unfortunately, I totally lost the interest in it. Over the last year, it grew on me again and I baked a lot of things and failed and succeed and failed again and so on. In these past few months, I would have liked to kick my buttocks once or twice, because if I had admitted my enthusiasm for baking earlier, then I would have been able to bake much more with my grandmother instead of just replicating her recipes on my own. Sometimes that makes me feel a bit blue. Anyway, I do not like to stay in such a state of mind for long, so I take countermeasures quickly.

 

lemon cake

 

This means: I select one of my grandmother’s recipes, bake it, and beam myself back into her kitchen for a short time. On the occasion, I just recently made her wonderful lemon loaf cake, which she traditionally baked in the shape of lambs for Easter.

As soon as I started grating the lemons, I was standing next to my grandmother again. I used to help her beat the eggs into the bowl, stir the dough and grease the pan. The fresh smell of the lemon hung in the air and was topped only by the delicate scent of the cake later on. During the baking time, my brother and I peeked into the oven over and over again and watched the dough rise higher than the lamb pans. Once the surface had a beautiful golden brown color, the delicacies came out to cool down. And as soon as the cakes had a decent temperature, Granny (Oma) cut off the part that rose above the pan, as the lambs needed a flat bottom to not constantly fall over. My dearest brother and I were allowed to eat those wonderful, lukewarm pieces. Every year, this was a wonderful, pre-easter feast for the two of us.

Such memories are wonderful, we really should honor them and give ourselves the chance to create new ones. With this in mind, and with my Grandma’s recipe for her gorgeous lemon loaf cake, I dismiss you for today. Happy Easter, dear ones!

 

lemon cake

 

INGREDIENTS

for 12 piece (loaf pan 9”)

8.8 oz butter, room temperature

7 oz Zucker

0.3 oz Vanillezucker

4 large egg

1 lemon

7.4 oz bread flour

1.4 oz starch

1 tsp baking powder, leveled

1.7 oz almonds

0.4 oz powdered sugar

1 pinch of salt

 

 PREPARATION

Finely chop the almonds or grind them with a blender. Prepare the lemon by grating the peel and squeeze the juice out.

Line a baking pan with parchment paper. If you are not a fan of parchment paper, just grease your baking pan with butter and dust it with flour. Preheat the oven to 365 °F.

Cut the butter into small cubes (0.4” x 0.4”), put them in a bowl and stir with a hand mixer until it is foamy. Mix the sugar with the vanilla sugar and the salt and stir it into the butter. Add the eggs one at a time.

Gradually add the flour-baking powder mix (mix those two ingredients first), the almonds, the lemon zest and 1 tablespoon of the juice.

Fill the dough into the pan and smooth. Bake the lemon cake for 50 minutes. Pierce the middle of the cake with a toothpick. If no dough sticks to the toothpick, take the pan out of the oven, otherwise continue baking for 5 to 10 minutes.

 

lemon cake

 

Your lemon cake should rest in its pan for 10 minutes, before you drop it and allow it to cool down completely. Before you eat it, dust generously with powdered sugar.

I personally like his cake best on day two to four. On the first day it is very fluffy and tender, however, the flavors have not yet fully unfolded. If you do have the patience, let your lemon cake rest overnight under a cake dome.

Grandma's Lemon Loaf Cake

03/29/2018
: for 12 piece (loaf pan 9”)
: easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 8.8 oz butter, room temperature
  • 7 oz Zucker
  • 0.3 oz Vanillezucker
  • 4 large egg
  • 1 lemon
  • 7.4 oz bread flour
  • 1.4 oz starch
  • 1 tsp baking powder, leveled
  • 1.7 oz almonds
  • 0.4 oz powdered sugar
  • 1 pinch of salt
Directions
  • Step 1 Finely chop the almonds or grind them with a blender. Prepare the lemon by grating the peel and squeeze the juice out.
  • Step 2 Line a baking pan with parchment paper. If you are not a fan of parchment paper, just grease your baking pan with butter and dust it with flour. Preheat the oven to 365 °F.
  • Step 3 Cut the butter into small cubes (0.4” x 0.4”), put them in a bowl and stir with a hand mixer until it is foamy. Mix the sugar with the vanilla sugar and the salt and stir it into the butter. Add the eggs one at a time.
  • Step 4 Gradually add the flour-baking powder mix (mix those two ingredients first), the almonds, the lemon zest and 1 tablespoon of the juice.
  • Step 5 Fill the dough into the pan and smooth. Bake the lemon cake for 50 minutes. Pierce the middle of the cake with a toothpick. If no dough sticks to the toothpick, take the pan out of the oven, otherwise continue baking for 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Step 6 Your lemon cake should rest in its pan for 10 minutes, before you drop it and allow it to cool down completely. Before you eat it, dust generously with powdered sugar.
  • Step 7 I personally like his cake best on day two to four. On the first day it is very fluffy and tender, however, the flavors have not yet fully unfolded. If you do have the patience, let your lemon cake rest overnight under a cake dome.


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